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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
in how washington, d.c. is going to vote in the election. but in the real world, out in the rest of the country, the president just won reelection and his party, the democrats picked up seats in the house and senate at the same time. before this election, which the democrats did very well and the republicans did not do well, before this election happened, the republican speaker of the house john boehner had proposed that revenues should be raised by this much. this was his pre-election offer. after the election, which his party lost, after contesting on these grounds, after the election where his side lost, look at his new offer. now he's offering this much new reven revenue. his offer has gotten worse. you cannot have what i offered you before the election. what election? that's how the republican house speaker is playing the game this week. maybe in the world of the beltway and the sunday morning talk shows, maybe that makes sense. in the real world, here's what happened. here's the bigger picture. our economy broke very, very badly. not long ago on a historic scale. now in the
crazy. and george bush lost re-election. since then the party's been committed to never compromising on the tax issue, no matter the deficit. no congressional republican has voted for an increase in taxes since 1990. think about it. for nearly a quarter of a century, no new income taxes. in the current congress, 236 house republicans vowed never to raise taxes. 40 gop senators also kept that pledge. even president george w. bush, the man who got us into two wars we didn't pay for. the president who exploded our deficit. he insisted the solution to our problems were more tax cuts. president clinton handed him a $236 billion surplus. a surplus. and left office with a $1.2 trillion deficit. but he just had to keep those tax cuts coming, but something remarkable may be happening in our politics. we're on the verge of something big. after decades of silliness, this lock-step republican fantasy that has hurt our country, president obama is close to breaking the gop tax unity. >> unfortunately, the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. you know, he talks, for example, about
, santa claus is coming to town ♪ >> so he won't win the grammy but he did win the big one on election night and that's what counts to a lot of us in america. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> knives out on the right. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. when a party loses an election, the knives come out. right now we're watching the night of the long knives on the right. these stories breaking tonight. right wing senator jim demint, the man behind too many failed right wing senate challengers, christine "i'm not a witch" o'donnell, richard mourdock announced today he's quitting the senate to run the hard right heritage foundation. meanwhile, in the republican house a purge is under way with speaker boehner dumping uncontrollable right wingers from prize committee assignments. they're out because they're too right. so what is too right for the republicans following the defeat this week or their defeat last month? is voting nay in the senate against a handicap rights treaty be
goal is reporting, finding the truth and calling out hypocrisy. tonight the people you elected to go to washington and get things done can't seem to make any progress at all on the looming fiscal cliff. instead, what we have is a game of finger pointing, both democrats and republicans, what else, blaming each other for the lack of a deal. now, keep in mind time is of the essence here. automatic tax hikes and spending cuts will go into effect in just four weeks if your members of congress can't come together and do a deal. on paper, it shouldn't be too hard. it's the job the american people elected them to do and the american people expect results. they want compromise. in fact, two separate cnn/orc polls, in those polls, an overwhelming number of people, 72%, said both sides should do a better job working together in general. so the people, that's you, want compromise. yet this is how the men and women on capitol hill, the men and women you elected to work for you, have responded over the last 48 hours. >> i think we're going over the cliff. >> it's unfortunate that the white house h
doesn't mean you have to work together on everything. and it also means that elections have consequences. now it's time for "the last word" with lawrence o'donnell. >>> tonight, jay carney's position in the white house secretary hall of fame is assured by what he said today in the white house press briefing room about the republicans' latest budget proposal. quote, it is magic beans and fairy dust. >> i'm worried about the fiscal cliff in the same way i'm worried about martians. >> fiscal cliff. >> fiscal whatever it is. >> is this a rerun? >> still no progress as all sides jockey for position. >> i would say we're nowhere. >> speaker john boehner issued a downer offer yesterday. >> the white house quickly dismissed it. >> the speaker's proposal is out of balance. >> it is more of the same. >> it is not me being positive. it is the math. >> magic math. >> magic beans and fairy dust. >> president obama did win the election. >> me thinks somebody made him king. >> no. i don't think that's right. >> he doesn't see where he stands in the universe. >> i would say we're nowhere. >> are we that
in the election. some members of the gop are pushing former congressman jc watts to run for chairman, but a lot of people in the party don't seem too hot on the idea. a leader tells our peter hamby he had no prayer. roland martin warns that responses like that could backfire. he writes even if they choose not to vote for watts, if he decides to even seek the job, it is his skin color and perspective. "outfront" tonight, jc watts. good to see you. what do you think about what role land martin had to say, that the party needs to be careful how it responds to you, considering running, thinking about race. >> well, i don't necessarily believe that the answer tis to take a black face and put him in the chair at the rnc or asian or native american. i think we have to surround ourself at the rnc and within the party, we have to understand diversity and diversity is not a bad word. i take a biblical world view on diversity. god made you white. he made me black. he made you a female. he made me a male. i think god likes diversity, so if it's good for god, it ought to be good for republicans, but the fac
on the november mid term election? and if you hook at-- and then later on, reflexively supported the regime in ruwan da when there were more war crimes committed and since vowed to heal that, but, you know, you've seen her political statements recently that showed there's a political side of susan rice and willingness for talking points that we can't afford as secretary of state and john kerry, he was part of the foreign senate relations committee and he was back in the late 60's and talked about war crimes that he reportedly saw against the vietnam war and you have some track records that don't make them the best fit. >> there are numerous republicans, john mccain, lindsey graham, a barraso who sates i would support john kerry as secretary of state who in their words would cruise through a nomination. and how would an affect if those two are in place? >> if you like what's in the last four years, you're going to get more of the same. deep defense cuts. if you had john kerry as secretary of defense. what we need is a strong secretary of defense, in spite of drawdowns and budget cuts is goin
it seem to you that the president feels as though he has some leverage here? he won the election, right? >> he did. >> maybe that accounts for what's in his proposal. >> yeah. this is clearly a different president obama than the one we saw during the debt ceiling negotiations or even after the midterm elections in 2010 when he felt a little weakened and there was the extension of those bush tax cuts for the wealthy. so i think when you're seeing here is a president who put this on the table, trying to please his base, okay? which got him elected after all. saying, this is my wish list, this is in a perfect world, this is what i would do. i don't think anyone at the white house expected the republicans to say, oh, thank you mr. president, yes, this looks lovely. let's go on and work on a deal. no, that's not what it was. the white house -- this is alfonse gaston a little bit here. and so they're waiting for the republican response. and what they're really talking about, brooke, is getting some kind of a first step. a down payment. ironically they all know what -- in the big picture needs
election campaign. >> and overseas, protests get violent in egypt where the once stable nation appears to be on the verge of crisis. first, let's get to the news live at 5:30 here at 30 rock in new york city. we begin with 25 days to go until the year end fiscal cliff deadline for the first time in days president obama and speaker boehner spoke on the phone yesterday. both men agreeing not to publicly characterize how the conversation went. but the stalemate in negotiations entered bold new territory yesterday with treasury secretary tim geithner suggesting the white house is ready to go off the cliff if republicans refuse to raise taxes on the top 2%. >> if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. again, there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest members. only 2%. the size of the problem in some sense is so large it can't be solved without rates going up. again, there is broad recognition of that reality now. >> one fallback option, republicans are rep
? >> well, piers, as you know, there were a number of efforts before the election to get this done and there were major differences between the parties, and those parties became a big part of the conversation during the presidential debate. the president could not have been clearer that he wanted to do two things. he wanted to boost economic growth by doing things like investing in our infrastructure which used to be a bipartisan idea, but also, extending middle class tax cuts and as you said, asking the wealthiest to pay a little bit more to reduce the deficit. that was part of the conversation. so we would hope that the election would break a little bit of this logjam. obviously that hasn't happened yet. the president's put his plan on the table. i'm still very hopeful, piers, that we'll get there. i agree with you, it would be better to get there sooner rather than later. time is running out. no doubt about it. >> one of the big problems it seems to me is the relationship between john boehner and barack obama. just seems deeply flawed. they're at a party and they couldn't be bot
this election. it's not like the debt ceiling debacle in 2011 went over well with the american public. the american public was disgusted by it, it was brinks manship that people did not like to see, in a recession, they thought it endangered the economy, republicans also know that if you look at the polls and they look at the polls, that the public would blame them if we go over the fiscal cliff by a 2 to 1 margin. so i would say that right now, and i think even republicans would stipulate this, wolf. the president has the leverage here, i mean, republicans also know that if they were to go over the cliff that the tax cuts on the wealthy would increase. you could come back and undue the tax cuts on the middle class expiring. but the president's in a pretty good bargaining position here, which is why you see him sort of hold firm. >> what leverage do the republicans have? >> well, look, i think it -- they understand that for some liberals going over the cliff is okay, because liberals say, you know what, we get those defense cuts we wouldn't get otherwise, and they believe the public w
a pretty dramatic shift since the election, and certainly i salute him for doing this, he actually is very engaged with the business community. and i'm not hearing the sort of things from top ceos and business leaders today that i heard the first four years. maybe -- maybe he's leaning in here and trying to rebuild a relationship with some of these people who supported him in '08. >> and i think it goes both ways. i think the business community views this deficit thing as the biggest problem that we can solve that we need to solve. there's something called a campaign to fix the debt, which i'm on the steering committee, 120 leading ceos from everything from general electric to jpmorgan on down. really committed to doing something and accepting the idea that revenues have to go up, not ideological about how, but most of all, wanting a big $4 trillion package. and so they have become, in effect, allies of the president. they're really trying to get to the same place. at some point there may be differences over how much entitlements, how much this or that, but right now their interests are al
in the worst crisis there since the revolution two years ago. egypt's first elected president, mohamed morsi, wanted to bring calm with a televised address tonight. he didn't. last month, morsi granted himself near-absolute power. thousands of protesters are demanding that morsi scrap a proposed new constitution that they fear will take away many of their rights. holly williams is in cairo for us tonight. holly. >> reporter: well, scott, some people here thought that after days of protest and bloodshed, president morsi would make a major concession tonight, but what he did offer won't be enough theirs opponents. they wanted him to immediately give up all of the sweeping new powers that he gave himself two weeks ago, and they wanted him to postpone a referendum on egypt's new constitution, which is due to take place in under 10 days' time. they say that constitution doesn't protect the rights of all egyptians. but president morsi didn't do either of these things. instead, he offered to give up just one of his new powerses, a vaguely worded right to take all necessary steps to protect the coun
the first democratically elected president it egypt, who happened tt be muslim brotherhood and forced out that demonstrated against him are more liberal. middle society, women, labor and minorities. that is indicative morsi is not representative of the consensus that we thought he would represent and that is the crisis that will be on for a long period of time. melissa: as we watch all these pictures go by and we know how some people feel about the west and america and especially morsi, we considered the idea we're sending $1.6 billion in aid to egypt every year. now europe is calling on the u.s. to stop that. what do you think about that? what is our best move at this point? >> well, let's remember that those 1.6 more or less billion dollars that we've been sending to the egyptian government, to mubarak for last 30 years or so, were sent for egypt to protect the peace with israel. to make sure the suez canal is always open for international trade and maintain security and friendship with the united states. now that morsi and the muslim brotherhood and salafists allies have form ad govern
there should be compromise. if you are elected official you should represent all of the united states and you should compromise and hear both sides. >> i think you should go off the fiscal cliff. americans are barreling down the road that's debt. there is a fork in the road. on the left are all our kids and our grand kids and the next generations. and on the right the road on the right is the fiscal cliff. really that the is choice if we don't do something about it we are going to go anyway. do you run over the kids with the car or do you take the other road which is not a good one but better than running over your kids fiscal cliff. it's a hard choice. >> but if we don't do it, if we don't go over the fiscal cliff the democrats will never cut a dime in spending. >> why would the democrats want change? if the bush tax cuts are going to expire they are saying this is great because this means the rich are going to pay more money, we are going to have more money to spend. they are already spending a the lo. they are saying why would we want change? this is great we have more money to spend. >> n
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)